Category archive

On the Front Page

Is China Splitting From Europe Over Carbon Trading?

in News/On the Front Page/Opinion
Mixed China and Europe flag, three dimensional render, illustration

by: SKYLAR DRENNEN NANJING – On March 9th Climate Home, an online publication focused on the international politics of climate change, published an article titled “China floats split with EU over carbon trading”. Citing Chinese Academy of Science (CAS) vice president and National People’s Congress (NPC) member, Wang Yi, as their source, Climate Home published a number of quotations indicating that China might need to consider a carbon tax in addition to or even in place of the cap and trade program slated to officially launch nation-wide this year. Wang, not to be mistaken for the Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, is involved in a number of key sustainability and climate change organizations including a Vice Chairship of the International Organization for Standardization’s Climate Change Coordinating Committees (ISO CCCC). His comments cannot be directly interpreted as an official policy change, but they are nonetheless worthy of consideration. Is China preparing…

Keep Reading

Upheaval in Korea: The Opinions of Young Voters

in On the Front Page/Opinion

by: CAROLINE YARBER   Last month, the South Korean National Assembly voted to impeach President Park Geun-hye after a political scandal sparked protests nationwide (for background, see Julia Wargo’s article here). President Park has since been impeached. We spoke to several young Koreans to find out how they were feeling about the current situation in their country. The overwhelming feeling from those we spoke to was anger and disappointment. Joohee Kim, a senior at Seoul National University, describes her reaction as mixed between “surprised, angry, helpless, disappointed and ashamed.” Jeewon Sa, a junior at Korea University, describes a sense of hopelessness as the controversy is increasingly convoluted. Korea has a long history of political corruption, but according to these young Koreans, President Park took the corruption to a new level. Bora Yang, a university student in Busan, explains, “I feel it is certainly shameful. The situation resulted from the accumulation…

Keep Reading

China’s New Domestic Violence Law: Progress or Posturing?

in On the Front Page

by MADISON REID NANJING — Women’s rights advocates in China recently gained a victory in the long battle to support victims of domestic violence. China’s first-ever national law against domestic violence went into effect on March 1, 2016. Before March 1, there was little legal recourse for victims of domestic violence. In 2001, the 1980 Second Marriage Law was amended to officially ban domestic violence, called on local committees to intervene in abuse and legalized divorce on the grounds of domestic violence. However, the amendment left gaping holes, which the Domestic Violence Law strives to fill. The new law defines domestic violence as physical and psychological violence between family members, including beating, verbal abuse, and intimidation. It also includes several prominent changes. First, it allows for victims to seek personal safety protection orders (essentially a restraining order), which could help victims quickly extract themselves from life-threatening situations. Second, it calls for more…

Keep Reading

An Interview with John Pasden

in Faculty/Experts/On the Front Page

BY LOGAN PAULEY John Pasden is the founder and head consultant of AllSet Learning in Shanghai, China. Over the years, John has led and worked for many successful Mandarin language acquisition outfits, such as being the international host of ChinesePod for many years and publishing Mandarin learning resources through his own consultancy and Mandarin Companion. John received his Master’s in applied linguistics from East China Normal University in 2008. Can you provide an overview of your career path so far? Sure… I should start by saying that my career was not really planned. I initially majored in microbiology at University of Florida, then switched to Japanese after studying a year in Japan. Despite getting fairly fluent in Japanese over my four-year college education, I basically jumped ship and went to China after graduating. I had studied three semesters of Chinese as an elective before going to China, so I already had…

Keep Reading

Clash of Civilizations at the Nanjing Museum

in On the Front Page

BY HANNAH SELLES In October, I visited the Nanjing Museum with my HNC roommate. The rival glories of ancient Egyptian and Western Han civilizations were on display at the special exhibit, “Kings and Pharaohs: Treasures of Ancient Egypt and China’s Han Dynasty.” We found ourselves captivated, not only by spoils of bygone kingdoms, but also by the colorful surge of weekend sightseers eager to get as close as possible to the past. As we entered the main hall, a mummy vied for attention with a Han era suit made of jade tiles meticulously sewn together with gold thread. Visitors milled between a wooden coffin with a delicate inlay of precious metals and an elaborately painted sarcophagus lid. The exhibit then branched off into two separate display spaces for each civilization, each broadly organized under headings such as “Life and Death,” “The Power of the State” and “Daily Life”. While the exhibit…

Keep Reading

The SAIS Cherry Blossom Ball 2016

in On the Front Page

BY SID RAVISHANKAR On March 26, SAIS D.C. students found their way over to Arena Stage to attend the Cherry Blossom Ball, an annual tradition at SAIS organized by the Student Government Association (SGA). The SAIS DC event sees more than five hundred SAIS DC students converge on a venue for an event Jill Huang, SAIS SGA president 2015-2016, describes as “the signature annual event at SAIS” and “basically the school prom.” The Cherry Blossom Ball is the culmination of many months of effort by the SGA, with weekly meetings over the course of months by SGA leaders. SGA President Huang, SGA Treasurer Lorena Americano Valente, and SGA Social Chair Joe Traw, along with Student Life director Khorey Baker, formed the core team. In describing this group’s goals with the Cherry Blossom Ball, Huang said “we just wanted people to have fun and have a great SAIS experience. I feel…

Keep Reading

SAIS Students Make the Consulting Case

in On the Front Page/SAIS Events

BY RUI ZHONG WASHINGTON-On a cloudy, rainy November 3rd, forty-four SAIS students worked in teams to build a better school lunch. Their goal, assigned by consultants overseeing the task, was to advise the benefit corporation Revolution Foods on opportunities to expand social impact and profitability. At the end of thirty-six hours, the teams would turn in a completed slide deck. Five days afterwards, they would each prepare to pitch their ideas to improve Revolution Foods to a panel of judges from top consulting firms. The Deloitte Case Competition arrived at SAIS on November 3rd, and was a collaborative effort between the consulting conglomerate the student-run SAIS Consulting Club, and SAIS Career Services. MA Candidate Kaitlin Lavinder, who serves as SAIS Consulting Club President, credited her club’s efforts, enthusiasm by alumni working at Deloitte, and the guidance of Career services during the process. “A former SAIS Consulting Club Board member worked…

Keep Reading

Gathering the SAIS Family Around the Table

in On the Front Page

BY KADY HAMMER AND ANNA VASUDEVAN, SAIS OBSERVER BOLOGNA, Italy — As mentioned at the Thanksgiving dinner held Friday, Nov. 27 at SAIS Europe by honorary speaker Lee Sutton, Thanksgiving is all about tradition. According to Sutton, the social meaning of Thanksgiving is “about being thankful for friends and family, and being able to share good food, laughter and fun.” While the historical saga of the first Thanksgiving is remembered each year, the true holiday spirit is often embodied in the tradition of recreating passed-down recipes and celebrating with our loved ones. For many at SAIS Europe, Thanksgiving 2015 broke tradition in several respects. Some SAISers had never celebrated Thanksgiving away from home. Recreating traditional Thanksgiving dishes proved difficult for volunteers as ingredients for favorite American dishes were hard to find in Bologna. And celebrating Thanksgiving on a Friday instead of Thursday was the most obvious break from the norm.…

Keep Reading

International Dinner Brings Cultural Flavor to Washington Campus

in On the Front Page

BY RUI ZHONG WASHINGTON — A platter of freshly julienned tomatoes, carrots and papaya were scooped into a mortar and pestle, handful by handful. Along with other toppings and a few dollops of fish sauce, the vegetables were meticulously ground into a colorful, sweet salad known as som tam. The Thai Club’s som tam and other home-cooked fares, which included pad thai and chicken panang curry, were loaded up into small plates and swapped for tickets at the 2015 SAIS International Dinner. Over the course of an evening, SAIS’s cultural clubs donned Chinese qipao, South Asian salwar, and Japanese happi jackets to celebrate international cultures and food. Card tables set up throughout the cafeteria were decorated with bright posters, banners and small trinkets from various countries. The SAIS Observer spoke with a few representatives busily preparing to serve international dinner guests, and asked about the dishes they had brought. “With…

Keep Reading

Experiencing the Paris Attacks

in On the Front Page

BY FATIMA NANAVATI I had just finished midterm exams and was excited to finally have a break from the chaotic stress bubble commonly known as graduate school. I went home to frantically pack my bags for an exciting weekend trip to Paris. Being fortunate enough to study abroad in Italy, I had been eager to visit my first home-away-from-home for a while. I moved to Paris when I was 17 years old and ready to experience the world outside of my childhood home, laced with a small white picket fences, in the town of Oakville, Canada. After a couple of years studying and working there, the city had gained a spot in a special corner of my heart. It was my city of “firsts” and kick-started my (somewhat) adult life. Everything from buying my own groceries, to paying rent, to making new friends, to finding my way around, and even…

Keep Reading

1 2 3 7
Go to Top