SAIS’s Role in US-China Dialogue

By Qianrong Ding Intercultural communication has never been more important than today given the turbulent US-China relationship. The SAIS US-China Dialogue contributes to this effort through a series of meaningful discussions on pressing issues, helping to foster understanding between China and the United States. The US-China relationship is one of the most complex bilateral relationships... Continue Reading →

Editorial: The Insurrection Will Be Live Streamed

By Adam DuBard The Capitol Hill riot on January 6, 2021, was an event completely without precedent, and one that captured the nation’s attention immediately. Following a rally where President Trump and several of his closest supporters, including several members of Congress, spoke, thousands of Trump supporters marched from the White House to Capitol Hill.... Continue Reading →

Where does the Democratic Party go from here?

By Adam DuBard The Democratic Party and its base were faced with an unfortunate dilemma in the wake of the November 2020 elections. With the votes all counted, how were Democratic voters meant to evaluate the electoral results? Yes, priority number one had been accomplished with Joe Biden’s victory over President Trump, and two Senate... Continue Reading →

The Flaws of SAIS’ Class Bidding System

By Alex Kessler At the beginning of every semester, SAIS students gamble on their education through a complex bidding system. Popular classes such as Illicit Finance, Risk Modeling, and The Rise of Economic Nationalism drive a competitive auction, often resulting in a clearing price above 1000 points. While bidding exists to allocate finite classroom seats... Continue Reading →

Transforming workers into spenders: Chinese cities call for longer weekends 把员工转变为消费者:周末延长政策将何去何从?

By Phyllis Brown 铠凌 NANJING, CHINA — When French director Chris Marker released the classic short film “Sunday in Peking” in 1956, the concept of a weekend was still alien to China. Since urban workers only had Sundays off, households often pitted against time to complete errands that had accumulated all week. Likewise, a rest... Continue Reading →

COVID-19: Recession & Recovery

How much money should the government spend? By Leif Olson During the October 6th meeting of the National Association for Business Economics, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said that the risk of the government spending designed to pull the economy out of the recession is small. Powell has perhaps been more outspoken about fiscal policy... Continue Reading →

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